Tamil Community Centre

A first look at the Tamil Community Centre

We are excited to share the first design of what the Tamil Community Centre could look like! Below is a module for you to learn more about the design and provide your feedback.

The pre-design study shows how 311 Staines Road can be used for a Tamil Community Centre, both the opportunities and the constraints.

We kept five guidelines in mind for the design: (1) programming space based on consultations, (2) commitments to the environment, (3) respect to Indigenous communities, (4) solutions to resident concerns, and (5) Tamil culture and history.

The design is inspired by traditional Tamil architecture (a central courtyard), the Tamil language and concepts from ancient Sangam poetry (landscape), and the Tamil people’s history of migration, refuge and asylum (a ship).

Aerial Perspective

Aerial Perspective

In this rendering, you can see all major features of the site: the building in the northeast corner, the field, the children’s playground, and the meadow. You can see the letter ழ traced into the landscape. The building incorporates the Mullai and the Kurinci rising from a flat service with trees to a higher point like a hill. Ample parking is provided to alleviate traffic concerns while also recognizing that many people who live in the area will walk, bike, or take transit. There is also a vehicle pickup and drop off area to discourage car usage and parking. The building is located in the most northeast corner of the site with a low building profile to be as minimally intrusive as possible to local residents who live nearby. To act as a public amenity, the roof will be designed as a green roof providing people with an opportunity to walk and enjoy elevated views of the Rouge National Urban Park. Hiking trails will connect the TCC site to the ark.. The site will also be rewilded with many trees sheltering the site from the main road. The site and building have been kept relatively low while using landforms and geography to provide universal accessibility. All colours used for the building are earth tones that blend in with the natural environment.

West Perspective

West Perspective

In this rendering, you are facing east from Staines Road the form of the building is reminiscent of a glimmering ship run aground on a welcoming shore. These are the cultural components; library, archives, and museum, paying homage to the Tamil people’s modern histories of migration, refuge, and asylum. You can also see the many walkable areas for everyone, as an intergenerational place for congregation and socializing.

Southwest Perspective

Southwest Perspective

In this rendering facing northeast from Staines Road, a dynamic cross-section of movement and activity can be experienced including the vehicle drop off area and how people can use the site's many public amenities such as cycling, running, sport or just enjoying the outdoors.

East perspective

East perspective

In this rendering facing northwest from the field. To provide local residents privacy, the part of the ship that is facing the homes in the neighbourhood will use an opaque material. This also allows people using the library, archives, and museum a quiet moment for reflection. As the ship goes from opaque to transparent material it faces the homelands, providing a symbolic gesture of people’s minds clearing as they look homeward. You see people on the green roof watching people playing on the field and taking in the beautiful sights of the Rouge National Urban Park. The keel of the ship is clearly visible.